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Category Archives for Trivia from Olivia

TRIVIA FROM OLIVIA: Followers of Nefertiti

Queen Nefertiti is one of the most well-known of the Egyptian royals, mostly because of the beautiful bust of her which now resides at the Egyptian Museum of Berlin. The 3,000+ year old bust presents Nefertiti as a woman of extraordinary beauty. Unfortunately, it is housed in Germany, despite multiple requests that it be repatriated to Egypt, something my husband, a museum professional, feels strongly about.

But in more recent news, archeologists have claimed to have discovered evidence of a possible hidden chamber behind the tomb of Tutankhamen, Nefertiti’s step-son or even possibly her son. Efforts to investigate this possible secret chamber are still underway, but there are some very interesting theories. To appreciate those, we must first know a bit about the Queen herself.

Nefertiti was the wife of King Akhenaten, and is believed to have been one of the only pharaohs’ wives to have wielded power nearly equal to the king’s. Her husband went to great lengths to display her as his equal. The two of them began a revolution of sorts by advocating the worship of a single god, Aten, instead of multiple gods. Egyptologist Dr. Christopher Naunten states, “They were closer to being Gods in their own right than any other pharaohs.”

Most of the pharaohs of the time before and after Nefertiti have been accounted for, but the queen’s body has never been located. Some evidence suggests she may have been buried in a place hundreds of kilometers away from the Valley of the Kings. The Armana tomb was made to house multiple burials, but her body has not been definitively identified as one of those that were there.

Still, there are reasons to believe that Nefertiti could have been buried in the Valley of the Kings. Some evidence suggests that when her husband Akhenaten died, Nefertiti ruled in his stead, possibly even dressing as a man for that role. So there is speculation that the hidden burial chamber was hers, and that when her son Tutankhamen reigned, he possibly assumed the goods and treasures from her chamber as his own. There is even a strange theory that the famous King Tut death mask was actually hers, and that the impression of her face was removed and replaced with that of the boy king.

I’d already created Red’s character for the Hotel Paranormal/ Lynlee Lincoln story, Escaping the Ashes even before I realized she would be Egyptian, so I was worried about her physical characteristics.  Red hair and fair skin.  Interestingly enough, there is evidence that some Egyptian mummies were naturally fair skinned and had red or even blonde hair.  So, I needn’t have worried.  Red could very well be Egyptian.

One last bit of trivia – when I began developing the part of Atreus in this story, I just intended that he would have been a slave of Queen Nefertiti. But when I began studying the tombs of the Egyptian royals, I came across the term ushabty or ushabti. These were small funerary figures placed in the tombs. Meaning “followers” or “answerers,” these were intended to carry out tasks for the deceased as they transitioned into the afterlife.

Happy reading, all!

 

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TRIVIA FROM OLIVIA: Bye, Bye Miss American Pie

When one of my editors went through Shifty Business, she commented on how “real” the airplane scene was and how she empathized with Gerry. There’s a good explanation for that realism. I’ve felt it! My husband is a pilot and just before we were married he purchased a 1958 Cessna 172—a “classic.” Now the hubby is an excellent pilot, but we’ve had some events that make a person like me awfully nervous. I tapped into those when I wrote the flying scenes.

Also, the airplane Nicky flies is an “old straight-tail.” Any pilot will know what that means and most of them sigh with nostalgia and remember the first one they ever flew. I sometimes think all pilots must have started out in an older Cessna 172. It’s a much-beloved airplane, sometimes called the Impala of the skies: durable and easy to fly.

So my dear husband calls our airplane American Pie II. His Cessna came off the assembly line the same month Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens and the Big Bopper went out on the Winter Dance Party Tour which would eventually lead to their deaths in an airplane crash… an airplane called American Pie. It may seem like a bad omen, but that “beautiful old bird” took us many a mile. And the story about her name is always a fun one to tell, especially since the Big Bopper was from my region of Texas and Buddy Holly was from the hubby’s hometown of Lubbock.

Don’t you just love how small the world is sometimes?

The hubby and I sold that gorgeous plane a few years ago and I know that he missed her a lot.  Still, it gave us a lot of fun and adventure for about 20 years!

Olivia Hardin

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TRIVIA FROM OLIVIA: The birth of Twelve Steps

Post-Prohibition Era diagnoses of alcoholism were grim. Some believed it might be an allergy of sorts to which some were more susceptible.  Most medical and psychiatric experts believed the condition was incurable and terminal. Those with limited resources were resigned to state hospitals or charities like the Salvation Army.  If you had financial support you might get more aggressive treatment including the “purge and puke” method with barbiturates and belladonna.

Still most of the time those resulted in relapse and eventually death associated with the condition.  In the beautiful story, A Tree Grows in Brooklyn when the doctor notes that the father’s death certificate will read pneumonia and alcoholism as the cause, the mother begs him to leave the word alcoholism off for her children’s sakes.  It’s a heartbreaking scene.

Eventually, though, a group of alcoholics, starting with Bill W. and Dr. Bob began to experiment and find success by applying the theories of The Oxford Society to their illness.  A Christian fellowship movement, The Oxford Society’s tenants were described by their founder as follows: “All people are sinners”; “All sinners can be changed”; “Confession is a prerequisite to change”; “The change can access God directly”; “Miracles are again possible”; and “The change must change others.”

Many of the beliefs of The Oxford Society were adapted for the problem of the alcoholic and although the two groups diverged in the later 1930s, many of the edicts of the twelve steps have some connective tissue to The Oxford Society.

I learned about Alcoholics Anonymous through The 75th Anniversary Edition of The Big Book of Alcoholics Anonymous.  Originally published in 1939, this book provides a description and definition of alcoholism as well as a step-by-step explanation of how the twelve step program works.  It then relates story after story told in first person by members of the group.  I can honestly say that listening to those accounts was a moving experience and I learned and gained more from The Big Book than I could ever have imagined when I started writing All the Wrong Reasons.  To find out more, please check out my A Pen and a Prayer blog post here.

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TRIVIA FROM OLIVIA: PMS and Football?

If you aren’t already familiar with my books, then you might not know anything about Trivia from Olivia.  But in almost each and every story that I publish, I include a strange, weird, obscure trivia or history snippet.  Hey, I’m married to a historian so it isn’t any wonder, right?

And in The Trouble with Holidays which is included in TROLLING FOR TROUBLE, my trivia was brought mostly by the hubby.

First, there’s PMS.  I was already dating the hubby when I decided to audit one of the history classes he taught at the local university.  I will never forget the day he lectured about PMS; the common aspect of many Native American tribes to be Polytheistic, Matrilineal and to have Sex-linked traits.  I explained the basics of what that means here in the story (read it to find out;-) but I just wanted you guys to know that I didn’t make it up.  The college professor who swept me off my feet about sixteen years ago used that in all of his United States History courses.

During The Trouble with Holidays Lynlee makes this comment about her job:
“I feel like the third string quarterback who gets put into the game at the end of the fourth quarter when we’re already winning two hundred and twenty-two to nothing.”

Originally I wrote 100-0, but when I mentioned it to hubby, he proceeded to tell me about the Cumberland vs Georgia Tech game that ended with a score of 222-0.  He thought he recalled the year of that game to be 1915, but it was actually 1916–still, pretty impressive that his brain can hold all of that “useless” information.

gt_cumberland_222_scoreboard

According to what I was able to find online, it appears that Cumberland College discontinued its football program, but that they weren’t allowed to cancel this particular game against Georgia Tech.  The internet provides lots of myths about the game, some of which have been debunked.  But I have to say the quote from the Atlanta Journal pretty much sums up what the game must have been like:

“As a general rule, the only thing necessary for a touchdown was to give a Tech back the ball and holler, ‘Here he comes’ and ‘There he goes.’”

Oh, and one more fun fact.  The coach for Georgia Tech that year?  None other than John Heisman.

Links:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1916_Cumberland_vs._Georgia_Tech_football_game

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/in-1916-georgia-tech-beat-cumberland-college-222-to-0-22745905/?no-ist

 

You can read TROLLING FOR TROUBLE and the entire Lynlee Lincoln Series FREE on Kindle Unlimited.

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TRIVIA FROM OLIVIA: Halloween, PMS and Football?

In my Lynlee Lincoln series, our favorite snarky witch lives in a strange sort of place that she affectionately refers to as “the mafia house.”  If you’ve ever wondered about that, the truth is that the mafia house really does exist… or at least it did at one time. The hubby and I looked at it about fifteen years ago when we were looking for a home in the Houston area. That house needed lots of love but I absolutely adored all the weird aspects of it. I mean, how cool would it be to have a bathroom with a hidden door to a crawl area with a floor safe, a peep-through window between rooms plus a huge bedroom-sized cedar closet? It was much bigger than we needed and already had a contract on it, so it wasn’t meant to be. Still, that crazy house remained in my mind until I had the dream that led to this story.

As a Catholic-girl, I was raised to know that the day after Halloween was All Saints Day, a holy day of obligation for us to venerate the saints. The day following was All Souls Day, which was to remember our departed loved ones and to pray for their passage into heaven.  Later, I studied Spanish and also Aztec history and I was fascinated by Día de los Muertos: the day of the dead. Today Mexico still celebrates this day by decorating graves and even leaving food for the departed to feast upon when they cross over into the realm of the living.

In this Trolling for Trouble I took a little dramatic license and chose to apply some of the beliefs about that day to All Souls Day.

And if you read Trolling for Trouble, you’ll also find out about PMS… but not the PMS you might be thinking.  I was already dating the hubby when I decided to audit one of the history classes he taught at the local university.  I will never forget the day he lectured about PMS; the common aspect of many Native American tribes to be Polytheistic, Matrilineal and to have Sex-linked traits.  I explain the basics of what that means here in the story itself, but I just wanted you guys to know that I didn’t make it up.  The college professor who swept me off my feet about twenty-one years ago used that in all of his United States History courses.

In that same story, Lynlee comments about the football score 222-0.  I wrote 100-0 in my first draft, but when I mentioned it to hubby, he proceeded to tell me about the Cumberland vs Georgia Tech game that ended with a score of 222-0.  He thought he recalled the year of that game to be 1915, but in actuality it was 1916–still, pretty impressive that his brain can hold such “useless” information.

According to what I was able to find, it appears that Cumberland College discontinued its football program, but weren’t allowed to cancel this particular game against Georgia Tech.  The internet provides lots of myths about the game, some of which have been debunked.  But I have to say the quote from the Atlanta Journal pretty much sums up what the game must have been like:

“As a general rule, the only thing necessary for a touchdown was to give a Tech back the ball and holler, ‘Here he comes’ and ‘There he goes.’”

Oh, and one more fun fact.  The coach for Georgia Tech that year?  None other than John Heisman.

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TRIVIA FROM OLIVIA: Roald Dahl and the Gremlins

“Gremlin” was a slang word coined by the Royal Air Force during the 1920s and its usage really picked up steam during the Second World War when the imaginary creatures became the scapegoats for all manners of mechanical problems and sabotage in aircraft.  Interestingly enough, the term was even used by the German military indicating these fantastical critters weren’t necessarily for one side or the other.

In September of 1940 a Royal Air Force pilot crashed his Gladiator plane in the desert of North Africa, sustaining serious injuries, including a concussion.  He took about six months to recover from his wounds and eventually went back to the front, even taking part in the Battle of Athens.  After the war that pilot went to the United States where he met writer C.S. Forester.  In 1943 the pilot published his first children’s book, The Gremlins.  You might better recognize that pilot’s later books some of which were my childhood favorites:  James and the Giant Peach, Willie Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, and Willie Wonka and the Great Glass Elevator among others.

The pilot’s name was Roald Dahl.  He credits his WWII plane crash with his becoming a writer, not only because his first published work was an account of his experience but also because he believed the injuries awakened a creative part of his brain.

After Dahl published The Gremlins he entered into talks with Walt Disney about making the story into a film project.  While that never happened, the gremlins continued to expand into pop culture.  The fictional creature made appearances in cartoons as well an episode of The Twilight Zone entitled “Nightmare at 20,000 Feet” featuring William Shatner.  And of course most of us remember them best from the movies Gremlins and Gremlins 2.

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